ANZSECS

The Australian and New Zealand Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies

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CfP: CREA XVIII, ‘Horror, the Real and the Fantastic’

CREA XVIII

2019 Conference

“Horror, the Real and the Fantastic”

Sorbonne Nouvelle, 7th December, 2019

This conference builds up on CREA XVIII’s 2017 conference on “Fact and Fiction”. It aims to explore the seldom discussed realism of the Gothic and the realism of ostensibly non-mimetic moments in fiction generally and in historical discourse in the long eighteenth century. Papers will consider how the real figures and is figured, explicitly in the treatment of character, cognitive content, and cause and effect, or as underpinning in the form of narrative technique.

Horace Walpole anchored the Gothic novel in the real at its inauguration in 1764. His preface to The Castle of Otranto told readers: “allow for the possibility of the facts, and all the actors comport themselves as persons would do in their situation”. A second preface reinforced his point, declaring that “he wished to conduct the mortal agents in his drama according to the rules of probability, in short, to make them think, speak and act, as it might be supposed mere men and women would do in extraordinary positions”. Tzvetan Todorov’s definition of the fantastic depends, in turn, upon the reader’s hesitation between the comprehension of the real as uncanny and a surrender to the supernatural marvellous as such.

Edmund Burke and Mary Wollstonecraft, among others, played on those epistemological modes, in particular in their accounts of the French Revolution; so did Catharine Macaulay in her description of the execution of Charles I. 

Papers may explore the issues outlined above in various forms of expository prose as well as in fiction, drama, poetry and art. Please submit proposal for 25-minute papers before 30 September 2019 to isabelle.bour@sorbonne-nouvelle.fr

CFP: XVII David Nichol Smith Seminar in Eighteenth-Century Studies

 

Call for Papers

David Nichol Smith Seminar in Eighteenth-Century Studies XVII
‘Dark Enlightenments’
2-4 December 2020
Adelaide, Australia

Keynotes:
Associate Professor Kate Fullager (Macquarie)
Professor Sasha Handley (Manchester)
Associate Professor Eugenia Zuroski (McMaster)

The Australian and New Zealand Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (ANZSECS), Flinders University, and the University of Adelaide invite you to the 17th David Nichol Smith (DNS) Seminar for Eighteenth-Century Studies. Inaugurated in 1966 by the National Library of Australia, the DNS is the leading forum for eighteenth-century studies in Australasia. It brings together scholars from across the region and internationally who work on the long eighteenth century in a range of disciplines, including history, literature, art and architectural history, philosophy, theology, the history of science, musicology, anthropology, archaeology and studies of material culture.

The theme for this conference is ‘Dark Enlightenments.’ We ask delegates to consider the dark, shadowy aspects of enlightenment processes of the eighteenth century. When broadly conceived, the theme is open to numerous up-to-the-minute, interdisciplinary possibilities, including (for example):

  • the dark side of the public sphere, such as expressed in satire and polemic;
  • Empire and enlightenment;
  • critiques of empathy and humanitarianism;
  • negative emotions;
  • crime, conflict and violence;
  • the use and abuse of the past;
  • progress and ethics (political, social, scientific);
  • war;
  • romanticising death;
  • the Gothic;
  • the numinous eighteenth century;
  • the transformation of night-time;
  • developments in notions of privacy, secrecy and the hidden self;
  • the “shady” moralities of libertinism;
  • the aesthetics of darkness and light.

This, we believe, is a particularly timely theme, partly owing to the nationalist turn in global politics, and the recent controversy stirred in Australia by the proposed Ramsay Centre for Western Civilisation. It offers both sides of the political spectrum the opportunity to interrogate and fully understand the costs, benefits, and legacies of eighteenth-century “progress.” It is also a theme designed to emphasise the Enlightenment in its moral complexity and richness, and the wide range of domains (from the everyday to philosophical thought) that contributed to its production.

We also welcome papers for subjects that fall outside the main conference theme.

Proposals for 20-minute papers should consist of a title, 250-word abstract, and short bio sent via email as a pdf attachment to DNS2020@flinders.edu.au.

We also accept proposal for panels of three papers, which should include all the above for each presenter, a panel title, and if possible, the name and short bio of the panel chair.

Deadlines for submissions:

For early deliberation: 1 November 2019. A first round of acceptances will be made shortly after this date to facilitate international attendance.

Final deadline: 1 March 2020

For further details, please consult the conference website: https://dnsxvii2020.wordpress.com/


Image: Joseph Wright of Derby, An Experiment on a Bird in the Air Pump (1768). National Gallery, London.

Romantic Studies Association of Australasia 2019 Conference: Embodying Romanticism

Call for papers

Although the body has preoccupied literary scholarship for some time, there has been a renewed attention in Romantic studies to the complex ways in which literature encodes and reproduces our awareness of embodied experience. Challenging views of Romanticism as bounded by visionary and idealist expression, such work reflects a reorientation of criticism around the materiality of Romantic culture, whether configured as part of the age of sensibility or in relation to the era’s natural and social sciences. The Romantic period was, moreover, a time when control of the body emerged as a key political issue in workshops, homes, battlefields and colonies, when bodies were subject to rapidly evolving ideas of gender, class and race, while new bodies of knowledge and corporate political bodies emerged to regulate the affairs of nations and empires. This was a period when bodies were subject to ever more intensive modes of analysis and management, at the same time that bodies imposed their transgressive physicality through new understandings of environments, vitalism, trauma, slavery, disease and taste. Attentive to such developments, Romantic studies in turn dovetails with a broader materialist emphasis that explores how bodies are shaped in relation to affect, biopolitics, speculative realism, post-humanism and eco-criticism. Alain Badiou has recently proposed that our modern, liberal ideology can today only perceive two objects: bodies and language. Aligning itself at the conjuncture of these two terms, this conference invites papers that broadly consider how embodiment was evoked, challenged and understood in Romantic cultural life.

We invite proposals for 20-minute papers on any aspects of Romanticism and embodiment. Proposals may be for individual papers or for panels of 3-4 papers.

Proposals
Abstracts of approximately 250 words are due by 30 June 2019.
Please send abstracts to the conference convenor, Neil Ramsey, at n.ramsey@unsw.edu.au.

Postgraduate bursaries are available.

See the conference website for full details: https://www.unsw.adfa.edu.au/conferences/rsaa

RSAA 2019 Call for Papers (PDF)

Embodying Romanticism – Romantic Studies Association of Australasia 2019 Conference

21 – 23 November 2019
UNSW Canberra Northcott Drive
Canberra ACT 2600 Australia

Confirmed Keynote Speakers
Professor Will Christie, Australian National University
Associate Professor Kevis Goodman, University of California Berkeley
Professor Clara Tuite, University of Melbourne


Call for Papers
Although the body has preoccupied literary scholarship for some time, there has been a renewed attention in Romantic studies to the complex ways in which literature encodes and reproduces our awareness of embodied experience. Challenging views of Romanticism as bounded by visionary and idealist expression, such work reflects a reorientation of criticism around the materiality of Romantic culture, whether configured as part of the age of sensibility or in relation to the era’s natural and social sciences. The Romantic period was, moreover, a time when control of the body emerged as a key political issue in workshops, homes, battlefields and colonies, when bodies were subject to rapidly evolving ideas of gender, class and race, while new bodies of knowledge and corporate political bodies emerged to regulate the affairs of nations and empires. This was a period when bodies were subject to ever more intensive modes of analysis and management, at the same time that bodies imposed their transgressive physicality through new understandings of environments, vitalism, trauma, slavery, disease and taste. Attentive to such developments, Romantic studies in turn dovetails with a broader materialist emphasis that explores how bodies are shaped in relation to affect, biopolitics, speculative realism, post-humanism and eco-criticism. Alain Badiou has recently proposed that our modern, liberal ideology can today only perceive two objects: bodies and language. Aligning itself at the conjuncture of these two terms, this conference invites papers that broadly consider how embodiment was evoked, challenged and understood in Romantic cultural life.

We invite proposals for 20-minute papers on any aspects of Romanticism and embodiment. Proposals may be for individual papers or for panels of 3-4 papers.

Topics might include:
• Affects and embodied emotions
• Sensibility and materialist epistemologies
• Materials, objects, things
• Life, organicism, vitality
• Theatre, bodies on stage, celebrities
• Labour, work, maternity
• Sexuality and gender
• Corpses, death, graves
• Race, empire, colonialism
• Disabled bodies, monsters, illness
• Spaces, environments, atmospheres
• Planetary bodies, heavenly bodies, cosmology
• Architecture, buildings and the body
• Medicine, surgery
• Slavery and transportation
• Biopolitics/biopower and the body politic
• Texts and paratexts
• Bodies of knowledge
• Animals and humans
• Organisations and institutions

Abstracts of approximately 250 words are due by 30 June 2019. Please send abstracts to the conference convenor, Neil Ramsey, at n.ramsey@unsw.edu.au

Postgraduate bursaries are available. See the conference website for details: https://www.unsw.adfa.edu.au/conferences/rsaa


The British Association for Romantic Studies 16th International Conference

Proposals are invited for the 2019 conference of the British Association for Romantic Studies, to be hosted by the School of English, University of Nottingham, from 25-28 July. Our theme is ‘Romantic Facts and Fantasies’.

We look forward to welcoming you to the East Midlands, where the historic city of Nottingham is located among the heartlands of British Romanticism. Newstead Abbey was Byron’s ancestral home; Sherwood Forest was re-imagined as the meeting place of Richard I and Robin Hood in Scott’s Ivanhoe; and the Cromford Mills are a living monument to Richard Arkwright, whose inventive development of spinning mills and power looms was an integral strand of the Industrial Revolution. This conference will explore the potency of ‘fact’ and fantasy’ both in the Romantic period and during the afterlife of Romanticism. The aim is to develop a collective understanding of how Romantic ‘fact’ and ‘fantasy’ work together and against one another, and in so doing embody the spirit of an age whose inventions and innovations laid the foundations for modernity while simultaneously exulting the power of the imagination and its creations.

Keynote speakers for Romantic Facts and Fantasies are Laura Mandell (Texas A&M), Robert Poole (UCLAN), Sharon Ruston (Lancaster), Diego Saglia (Parma), and Jane Stabler (St Andrews).

We encourage proposals for open-call sessions and themed panels as well as individual proposals for 20-minute papers. Subjects covered might include (but are not limited to):

Bicentenaries 1819-2019: The Peterloo Massacre; the ‘Six Acts’, the Carlsbad Decrees; the birth of Queen Victoria; Stamford Raffles and the foundation of Singapore; Simon Bolivar’s victory at Boyacá; the Panic of 1819; the opening of the Burlington Arcade, London; the Cotton Mills Act; the death of James Watt;  Keats’s odes; Scott’s Ivanhoe, Bride of Lammermoor, and A Legend of Montrose; the final volume of Southey’s History of Brazil; Blake’s ‘Ghost of a Flea’ (1819/20).

Factual and fantastical encounters and dialogues: travel narratives; poetry of encounter; translations; colonial discourses; geologies, geographies and aesthetics of landscape; rivers, canals, bridges and roads in material, commercial and imaginative landscapes.

Facts and fantasies of collective and individual identity: Romantic provincialism (the Lunar Society, the Lake School); national identity and ideas of the state; religion; ethnography; Romantic life writing and autobiography; Romantic-period economics, consumerism, industry and agriculture; Romantic facts and fantasies of childhood; Romantic experiments in education; Rousseauism.

The scientific imaginary: Mary and Percy Shelley; Humphry Davy, poet and scientist; the development and legacies of Romantic science fiction; Erasmus Darwin, the Lunar Society and Joseph Wright of Derby; Malthus and Malthusianism.

Imagining the Romantic world: Keats’s ‘living year’; plagiarism and originality; the professional imagination in Keats, Davy, Blake, Caroline Herschel and William Herschel; pedagogic and didactic poetry, prose and drama; histories and history-writing, including the emergence of national histories; paintings, sculptures and music commemorating the events and ‘heroes’ of the Napoleonic wars, politics, industry and culture; architecture and Romantic fantasy (eg. Walter Scott’s Abbotsford, William Beckford’s Fonthill Abbey, and Joseph Gandy’s visualisations of the Bank of England and other buildings by John Soane); Romantic book illustration and developments in the technology of print.

Presentation formats

We welcome proposals for the following:

Individual 20 minute papers. Abstracts of no more than 250 words (excluding the title). Please include your name and institutional affiliation (if applicable).

Panels of either three 20 minute papers or four 15 minute papers. Please include an abstract of the panel theme, together with 250-word (excluding the title) proposals from each of the speakers, in a single document.

Open-call sessions. Proposals should include a 350-word (excluding the title) description of the potential session, outlining its importance and relevance to the conference theme. Accepted open-call sessions will be advertised on the BARS 2019 website from mid-November 2018.

Submissions

The deadline for proposals for open-call sessions is Thursday 22 November 2018.

The deadline for submissions of panels and individual papers is Monday 17 December 2018.

Please email proposals to bars2019@nottingham.ac.uk.


(Shared from https://www.nottingham.ac.uk/conference/fac-arts/english/romantic-studies/call-for-papers.aspx)

 

The Bildungsroman: form and transformations

http://bildungsroman.org

A conference hosted by the Novel Network at the University of Sydney,
22-25 November 2018

This conference will explore the past and present condition of the Bildungsroman, with its myriad transformations and diversifications not only in the novel proper but also in memoir, film and long-form television. It will bring together exciting work in disciplines often separated by periodising and disciplinary paradigms and gather experts in prose fiction, film and television from the eighteenth to the twenty-first centuries and from a range of language areas to concentrate on this key narrative form. The novel of the emotional and social development or formation of a young person as they learn to make their way in an often hostile world, the Bildungsroman ­was a key form taken by the European novel from the early 19th century. How has it made its way across transhistorical formations and transgeneric remediations?

Keynotes:
Nancy Armstrong, Gilbert, Louis & Edward Lehrman Professor of English, Duke
Joseph Litvak, Professor of English and Chair of Department, Tufts
Katie Trumpener, Emily Sandford Professor of Comparative Literature and English, Yale

We invite proposals for individual papers, panels, roundtables and single text discussion sessions, on the following or other related topics. The panel format will involve pre-submission of the paper to ensure closer audience engagement with its arguments:

  • Theory and the bildungsroman
  • The bildungsroman, the künstlerroman, the erziehungsroman: overlaps and distinctions
  • The origins of the bildungsroman
  • The contemporary bildungsroman
  • The female bildungsroman
  • The queer bildungsroman
  • Gender in the bildungsroman
  • Narrative theory and the bildungsroman
  • Psychology and the bildungsroman
  • The postcolonial bildungsroman
  • The coming of age film as bildungsroman
  • The bildungsroman and television
  • The Bildungsroman and the city
  • Transnationalism and the bildungsroman
  • Memoir and the bildungsroman
  • The anti-bildungsroman
  • The eco-bildungsroman

200 word abstracts should be emailed by June 15 to vanessa.smith@sydney.edu.au.

Upcoming Digital Humanities Conference, Sydney

Digital Humanities is the annual international conference of the Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations (ADHO) and will next be held in Sydney, Australia, 29 June–3 July 2015.

This will be the first time that the annual Digital Humanities conference is being held outside of Europe and North America in its 26-year history. The theme of Global Digital Humanities acknowledges the field’s expansion worldwide across disciplines, cultures and languages.

DH2015 is hosted by the University of Western Sydney’s Digital Humanities Research Group, a leader in collaborative digital humanities in the Asia-Pacific region. The conference is held in partnership with the State Library of New South Wales and in collaboration with GovHack 2015 and the third International Linked Open Data in Libraries, Archives, and Museums Summit (LODLAM).

More details can be found at the conference website.

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